harness racing betting terms for horse

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For every bookmaker has a rule for what happens to a wager if it is placed on an event that ends up being abandoned for some reason. As with pretty much anything in countries like the UK, weather can have a massive impact on whether an event is likely to finish. Obvious examples include such things as lightning storms or flash floods, but snow flurries that make it impossible to see the markings on the pitch or the ball can also give the match officials pause for thought. Crowd safety will always be one of the first things that is taken into consideration by those who decide whether or not a match will be allowed to carry on.

Harness racing betting terms for horse nrl premiership betting 2021 corvette

Harness racing betting terms for horse

Dq: An abbreviation for disqualified. Driver: A person driving a harness horse in a race. Dropdown: A horse facing a lower class of rivals than he had been running against. Eligible: Qualified to start in a race, according to conditions. Entry Fee: The cost of nominating, entering or starting a horse in a stakes race. Entry: Two or more horses owned by the same stable or in some cases trained by the same trainer and thus running as a single betting unit. Rules on entries vary from state to state.

Equipment: Whip, blinkers, etc. Gear carried by a horse in a race. Farrier: Horseshoer, blacksmith. Also called a "platen". Fast Track: Track condition with footing at its best. Dry and even. Field: The final list of horses, selected by the handicapper that will contest the race. First-Over: The first horse to make a move on the leader in a race, moving up on the outside. Forced Wide: A horse that is forced to move wide on the track further away from the inside running rail , because of the actions of another runner.

Form: How a horse has been racing. Generally, good form is defined as close up finishes in recent starts - bad form is poor finishes in recent starts. Fractional Time: Intermediate times recorded in a race, as at the quarter, half, three-quarters, etc.

The "quarter time," for example, refers to the time after the first quarter-mile, not the first 25 percent of the race. Free Legged: A pacer, which races without wearing hopples which helps maintain it's gait is known as a free-legged pacer. Fresh Freshened : A rested horse.

Front-Runner: A horse whose running style is to attempt to get on or near the lead at the start of the race and to continue there as long as possible. Frozen Track : A condition of a racetrack where any moisture present is frozen. Gait: Harness horses are divided into two distinct groups, pacers or trotters, depending on their gait when racing. The gait is the manner in which a horse moves its legs when running. The pacer is a horse with a lateral gait, whereas a trotter has a diagonal gait.

Game: A horse that's brave, determined, or hard working. Gate Speed: How quickly a horse is able to leave from the starting gate. Gate: The starting mechanism. Gear: The equipment used by trotters and pacers. Good Track: Condition of the racetrack between fast and slow.

Graduate: Winning at a class and moving up. Gray: A horse color where the majority of the coat is a mixture of black and white hairs. The mane, tail and legs may be either black or gray unless white markings are present. Starting with foals of , the color classifications gray and roan were combined as "roan or gray.

Groom: A person who cares for a horse in the stables. Half: Half of a mile. Halter: Like a bridle, but lacking a bit. Used in handling horses around the stable. Hand: Four inches. A horse's height is measured in hands and inches from the top of the shoulder withers to the ground, e. Harness: The gear, which is used to attach the sulky to a horse, to carry the hopples and to enable the driver to steer the horse.

Head Of The Stretch: Beginning of the straight run to the finish line. Head: A margin between horses. One horse leading another, by the length of its head. Heat: 1 A race in which more then one running is required to decide the winner. Hobbles: The straps, which connect the front and rear legs on the same side of a horse. Most pacers wear hobbles to help balance their stride and maintain a pacing gait. The length of hobbles is adjustable and a trainer registers the length that best suits his or her horse.

There are also trotting hobbles that work through a pulley system to help trotters maintain their gait. Home Stretch: The straight length of the track, nearest the spectators, heading toward the finish line. It is called this because it is the final part of the track a horse travels down on its way 'home' or the finish line.

Horse: A male horse aged 5 years and over. Infield: Area encompassed by the inner rail of the racetrack. Jog: Slow, easy gait. Judge: The person who decides the official placings and margins for each race or trial. They are also responsible for deciding who the placegetters are in the event of a photo finish or developed print. Juvenile: Two-year old horse. Lame: The term used to describe a horse which is limping or has difficulty walking properly.

Lasix: A medication for the treatment of bleeding. Leader: The horse, which is out in front or leading during a race. This term may also be applied to a horse that most commonly wins races when in a leading position. Length: A measurement approximating the length of a horse, used to denote distance between horses in a race: Lines: Harness racing uses this term instead of reins, but it means the same thing. Loose Line: A horse on a loose line is one, which is allowed to run freely, without any pressure from the driver to speed up or slow down.

Maiden Race: A race for horses, which have never won a race. Maiden: A horse that has not won a race. Also applied to a non-winning driver. Match Race: A race between just two horses. Mudder: A horse, which races well on an off track. Neck: Unit of measurement. About the length of a horse's neck; a little less than a quarter of a length. Non-Starter: the starter or Stewards may declare a horse, which has failed to come within a reasonable distance of the mobile barrier, as a non-starter of the race.

All bets placed on a horse which is later declared as a non-starter, are refunded. Nose: Smallest advantage a horse can win by. Called a short head in Britain. Objection: Claim of foul lodged by a driver. Off Track: An off track refers to a wet racing surface. Official: the stewards have confirmed final results of a race.

Also used to denote a racing official. On The Board: Finishing among the first four. On The Pace: A horse, which is keeping up with the runner, which is determining the speed of the race. It means it's right up there with a good chance of winning. On The Pylons: A horse racing in a position next to the hub rail or pylons. Otb: Abbreviation for off-track betting. Out Of Position: A horse that is not in its designated position at the start of a mobile event is deemed to have been out of position at the start.

Overall Time: This is the time taken to complete the distance of the race. Overnight Race: A race in which entries close a specific number of hours before running such as 48 hours , as opposed to a stakes race for which nominations close weeks and sometimes months in advance. Overnight: A sheet published by the racing secretary's office listing the entries for an upcoming racing card. The pace of a race can affect how well certain horses are able to compete.

For example, if a pacesetter is able to set a slow pace, horses that are far back early will have a particularly difficult time making up ground once the pace picks up in the latter stages of the race. Conversely, if the early pace is torrid, it will be harder for pacesetters to withstand the late challenges of closers who benefit from a relatively slow second half.

Pacesetter: The horse that is running in front on the lead. Pacing: This Standardbred gait features legs on the same side moving forward and backward at the same time. Pacers are sometimes called amblers or sidewheelers. Paddock Judge: Official in charge of the paddock. Paddock: Area where the horses are saddled and paraded before post time. Parked Out: This term describes a horse that is racing on the outside, normally for an extended period of time.

Horses lose ground while racing on the outside and depending on the circumstances the amount of time spent racing on the outside, the pace, etc can be adversely affected by it. Past Performances: A compilation in the program of a horse's record, including all pertinent data, used as a basis for handicapping. Photo Finish: A finish between two or more horses which is so close a still photograph must be used to determine the order of finish.

Pinhooker: A person who buys a racehorse with the specific intention of re-selling it at a profit. Pocket: Boxed in, shut off. Running in a position with horses in front and alongside. Post Parade: Horses going from paddock to starting gate past the stands in post position: Position of stall in starting gate from which a horse starts.

Post Position: The position a horse leaves the starting gate from at the start of a race. Post Time: Designated time for a race to begin. Provisional Driver: In harness racing, a driver who's not fully licensed.

Public Trainer: One whose services are not exclusively engaged by a single stable and who accepts horses from a number of owners. Pulled Up: A horse, which has finished a race, has pulled up. The term can also refer to the act of a driver stopping his horse from competing in a race, while that race is still in progress, for example, because of injury or broken equipment.

Pulling Out: A horse that is pulling out in a race is one that is coming from the rail heading out wider on the track in an effort to secure a clear run. Pulling: Some horses get fired-up during a race and try to run faster than the tempo of the other runners. These horses are 'pulling'.

Horses that pull will usually waste a lot of energy in the process, leaving little in reserve for the finish. Pulled The Plugs: Drivers who pull the plugs during a race are merely releasing the earplugs that have been in their horse's ears up until that time. Ear plugs can help keep a horse's mind on the job and help nervous horses stay calm leading up to and during part of the race.

When released, the sudden exposure to more noise may help spur on the horse. Purse: The total monetary amount distributed after a race to the owners of the entrants who have finished in the usually top five positions. Qualifier: A race in which a horse must go a mile below an established time standard to prove itself capable of competing in pari-mutuel races. Race Call: The description of a race while it is in process, which includes such things as the positions of the runners at different stages, any moves made by drivers, and any incidents that occur.

A race is called or described by a race caller or announcer. Race Card: The entire day's race lineup makes up the race card. Racing Secretary: Official who drafts conditions of races. Rating: This is what the driver does when he asks his horse to save energy for a run later in the race. Recall: When the first attempt at starting a harness race is nullified by the official in charge of the start.

A restart of the race is called for. Rigging: A Standardbred's harness, protective equipment, and other gadgets designed to make him perform better, plus the manner in which it's fastened to him. Saddle Cloth: A cloth under the harness on which a horse's wagering number is displayed. Schooling: Process of familiarizing a horse with the starting gate and teaching it racing practices.

Scratch: To be taken out of a race before it starts. Trainers usually scratch horses due to adverse track conditions or a horse's adverse health. A veterinarian can scratch a horse at any time. Set: A group of horses being exercised together. Shadow Roll: A usually sheepskin roll that is secured over the bridge of a horse's nose to keep it from seeing shadows on the track and shying away from or jumping them. Shafts: The two long pieces that attach the sulky to the horse's harness. Shank: Rope or strap attached to a halter or bridle by which a horse is led.

Shipper: A horse who travels from where he's trained to race at another track. Short: A horse in need of more work or racing to reach winning form. Shuffled Back: This occurs when a horse is stuck on the rail and loses position when outside horses advance past him. Shut Off: Unable to improve position due to being surrounded by other horses. Solid Horse: Contender. Sophomores: Three-year-old horses.

Called sophomores because age three is the second year of racing eligibility. Pegs: Horses racing closest to the rubber pegs on the inside of the track are said to be racing on the pegs. It is the shortest way home with these horses saving the most ground during a race.

They often require luck to receive clear running later in a race. Quarters: There are four quarters that are recorded in harness racing. Analysing quarters will help show how the race was run. Rated: Sometimes you will hear a horse rated This means that they recorded a Standardbred: The breed of horse used in harness racing are called standardbreds. They are smaller than thoroughbreds which race in horse racing, but they often have a more relaxed temperament.

Their durability and versatility are another key-trait with harness racing horses able to race weekly, or sometimes two or three times in a week. They can race over distances between m up to m with many of them capable of racing over m one week and m the next. Standing Start: Horses will begin the race standing stationary behind elastic barrier tapes. This is the best method for handicapping harness races with each handicap being an increment of 10m.

Sulky: Drivers sit in sulkies which can also be known as a bike, cart, or gig. The common sulky weighs around kg and has two high-tech carbon fibre wheels. Three-wide Train: Most harness races in Australia will be run in two lines. Pegs horses will race on the inside of the moving line, or one-wide line. Later in a race, a third line often begins with horses making runs from back in the field.

This is sometimes known as the three-wide train or two-wide line. Trotters: Trotting is the natural gait for a standardbred. In Australia, pacers are more common than trotters. A trotter will move diagonally with the front left and rear right moving together and the front right and rear left moving together.

The game will be played form Manuka Oval in Canberra and gets underway at 7. As usual, we have you covered with a full preview and betting tips for the clash here. The EPL season continues this weekend with Matchday There are some very important fixtures set to play out and we have you covered with our best bets for them right here!

We have you covered with a full preview and betting tips for the clash from billy Bestford here read more. The best Australian sports betting sites ensure safe and successful online betting for punters. Here's our list of the best betting options in Australia. Julian Vallance from Sportsbet takes us through some of the key factors which he uses with pricing upcoming horse races such as performance ratings.

Check out his video from Sportsbet here. Over-Round is an important concept for both punters and sportsbooks. It's how Australian sportsbooks make money! All punters should understand over-round, how to spot it, and how to find better value on the Betfair Exchange. Ever wondered why you can get such great odds at Betfair in comparison to other online bookmakers? We break down why that is the case and why Betfair isn't just for professional punters here read more.

Footy is back with the AFLW season set to kick off tonight! The Kangaroos have been installed as the pre-season premiership favourites with the Dockers, Blues and Demons also among the contenders. The countdown is on until the BBL10 season officially gets underway! We ranked our BBL10 top 5 batsmen to watch earlier in the week, and today we are doing the same for bowlers!

Check out our BBL10 top 5 bowlers to watch, courtesy of Mr. Cricket, here. The BBL10 squads are pretty much finalised and the season is not far away! We've taken a look at the squads for each team, and put together our predicted starting lineups taking into consideration availability of Australian national players and the playing schedule of the international recruits. Check out our BBL10 team lineups here! The Big Bash League season is just around the corner!

In the lead up to BBL10, we will be taking a look at some of the key players who will be hoping to lead their teams to victory! Today, we go through the top five batsmen to watch in BBL10 read more. Harness Racing Glossary There are many common terms used in harness racing that may not make sense to those new to the sport. Harness racing glossary: key harness racing terms and what they mean Bell Lap: The final lap in a race is called the bell lap. Squaregaiters: Another term to describe trotters.

Betfair Commissions and Charges Ever wondered why you can get such great odds at Betfair in comparison to other online bookmakers?

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Also, a weight reduction to which female horses are entitled when racing against males, or that three-year-olds receive against older horses. Horses with this condition are known as non-sweaters. Most non-sweaters are athletic, but the condition appears frequently in pastured horses, who aren't ridden. Anhydrosis usually occurs when both the temperature and humidity are high. Horses raised in temperate regions and shipped to hot climates are most prone to develop the condition, but acclimated horses can be at risk, as well.

Clinical signs include inability to sweat; increased respiratory rate; elevated body temperature and decreased exercise tolerance. The condition is easily reversed by moving the horse to a more temperate climate.

Usually 10 pounds until the fifth winner, seven pounds until the 35th winner and five pounds for one calendar year from the 35th winner. This rule varies from state to state. Apprentices do not receive an allowance when riding in a stakes race. Every jockey going from track to track must have a receipt from the Clerk of Scales from their track, verifying the jockey's most recent total number of wins.

Bearing In Or Out : Deviating from a straight course. Bit: A stainless steel, rubber or aluminum bar, attached to the bridle, which fits in the horse's mouth and is one of the means by which a driver exerts guidance and control. Black: A horse color which is black, including the muzzle, flanks, mane, tail and legs unless white markings are present. Blanket Finish: Horses finishing so closely together they could be covered by a blanket. Bleeder: A horse that bleeds during or after a workout or race due to a ruptured blood vessel.

Blinkers: Device to limit a horse's vision. Bobble: A bad step away from the starting gate, usually caused by the track surface breaking away from under a horse's hooves, causing it to duck its head or nearly go to his knees. Bolt: Sudden veering from a straight course, usually to the outside rail.

Bounce: A poor race run directly following a career-best or near-best performance. Bowed Tendon: A type of tendonitis. The most common injury to the tendon is a strain or "bowed" tendon, so named because of the appearance of a bow shape due to swelling. Horses commonly re-injure the tendon when they go back into competition. Boxed In: A horse that is racing on the rail and is surrounded by other horses in front, outside and behind it. A horse that is boxed in is held up and unable to gain a clear passage.

Break: 1 To train a young horse to wear a harness. Almost always done when the horse is a yearling. When a horse goes offstride. A harness horse competes at either a trot diagonal gait or pace lateral gait. A break occurs when a horse goes offstride and into a gallop.

Break Maiden: A horse, or driver winning the first race of its career. Breakdown: When a horse suffers a potentially career-ending injury, usually to the leg; The horse suffered a breakdown. The horse broke down. Breather: Easing off on a horse for a short distance in a race to permit it to conserve it's energy. Bridle: A piece of equipment usually made of leather or nylon, which fits on a horse's head. Brush: A short burst of speed during a race. Bute: Short for phenylbutazone.

Often known by the trade names Butazolidin and Butazone. Calk: A projection on the heels of a horseshoe, similar to a cleat. Call Race Call : Running position of horses in a race at various points. Card: Another term for a program of racing. For example, a person may refer to there being twelve races on the card, which simply means twelve races will be staged on that particular day. Cart: Another term for sulky, or jog cart. Catch Driver: A driver, which does not train his or her own horses, and is engaged by other trainers to drive their horses.

Chart: A statistical "picture" of a race from which past performances are compiled , that shows the position and margin of each horse at designated points of call. Chestnut: Yellow-red, red-yellow to golden yellow horse with red main and tail.

Claiming Box: A box in which claims are deposited before the race. Claiming Race: A race in which each horse entered is eligible to be purchased at a set price. Claims must be made before the race and only by licensed owners or their agents who are eligible to claim horses at said track.. Claiming: The process by which a licensed person may purchase a horse entered in a designated race for a predetermined price.

When a horse has been claimed, its new owner assumes title after the starting gate opens although the former owner is entitled to all purse money earned in that race. Class: The level of competition that a horse has been facing. Generally, the higher class level the bigger the purse and the stronger the level of competition. Classic: A race of traditional importance. Closer: A horse that runs best in the latter part of the race, coming from off the pace. Clubhouse Turn: Generally, the turn on a racing oval that is closest to the clubhouse facility; usually the first turn after the finish line.

Coasting: A horse, which is going easily or traveling without pressure in a race, usually in front. See individual entries for definitions. Colt: An ungelded entire male horse four-years-old or younger. Company: Class of horses in a race. Condition Book S : A series of booklets issued by a racing secretary, which set forth conditions of races to be run at a particular racetrack.

Condition: The fitness level of a horse. For example, it may be described as peak racing condition or poor condition. Also the type of race horsemen can place their horses. Conditioned Race: A race where eligibility is based on age, gender, money won, or races won. Connections: Persons identified with a horse, such as owner, trainer, or driver, and stable employees.

Cooling Out: Restoring a horse to normal temperature, usually by walking. Cover: Describes when a horse is racing with a horse in front of him, especially on the outside. Live cover occurs when a horse has an advancing horse in front of him, dull cover occurs when the cover horse does not advance. Crossfiring: A Standardbred gait flaw that occurs when one hoof strikes the hoof s whip, or leg on the opposite corner.

Cuppy Track : A dry and loose racing surface that breaks away under a horse's hooves. Cushion: Top portion of a racetrack. The mane, tail and lower portions of the legs are always black unless white markings are present. Dark Day: A day on which no racing is conducted at a particular racetrack. Dead Heat: A situation in which the judges cannot separate two or more horses when judging the outcome of a race.

These horses are declared as having crossed the finish line at the exact same time. Dead Track: Racing surface lacking resiliency. Deep Stretch: A position very close to the finish line in race. Dh: Abbreviation for dead heat. Disqualification: Change in order of finish by officials for an infraction of the rules. Distanced: A horse that is out of touch with the rest of the field at the end of the race.

This is often referred to as finished distanced. Double: If a driver or trainer records two winners on a card, they are said to have recorded a winning double. Dq: An abbreviation for disqualified. Driver: A person driving a harness horse in a race. Dropdown: A horse facing a lower class of rivals than he had been running against.

Eligible: Qualified to start in a race, according to conditions. Entry Fee: The cost of nominating, entering or starting a horse in a stakes race. Entry: Two or more horses owned by the same stable or in some cases trained by the same trainer and thus running as a single betting unit.

Rules on entries vary from state to state. Equipment: Whip, blinkers, etc. Gear carried by a horse in a race. Farrier: Horseshoer, blacksmith. Also called a "platen". Fast Track: Track condition with footing at its best. Dry and even. Field: The final list of horses, selected by the handicapper that will contest the race. First-Over: The first horse to make a move on the leader in a race, moving up on the outside. Forced Wide: A horse that is forced to move wide on the track further away from the inside running rail , because of the actions of another runner.

Form: How a horse has been racing. Generally, good form is defined as close up finishes in recent starts - bad form is poor finishes in recent starts. Fractional Time: Intermediate times recorded in a race, as at the quarter, half, three-quarters, etc. The "quarter time," for example, refers to the time after the first quarter-mile, not the first 25 percent of the race.

Free Legged: A pacer, which races without wearing hopples which helps maintain it's gait is known as a free-legged pacer. Fresh Freshened : A rested horse. Front-Runner: A horse whose running style is to attempt to get on or near the lead at the start of the race and to continue there as long as possible. Frozen Track : A condition of a racetrack where any moisture present is frozen. Gait: Harness horses are divided into two distinct groups, pacers or trotters, depending on their gait when racing.

The gait is the manner in which a horse moves its legs when running. The pacer is a horse with a lateral gait, whereas a trotter has a diagonal gait. Game: A horse that's brave, determined, or hard working. Gate Speed: How quickly a horse is able to leave from the starting gate. Gate: The starting mechanism. Gear: The equipment used by trotters and pacers. Good Track: Condition of the racetrack between fast and slow. Graduate: Winning at a class and moving up. Gray: A horse color where the majority of the coat is a mixture of black and white hairs.

The mane, tail and legs may be either black or gray unless white markings are present. Starting with foals of , the color classifications gray and roan were combined as "roan or gray. Groom: A person who cares for a horse in the stables. Half: Half of a mile. Halter: Like a bridle, but lacking a bit. Used in handling horses around the stable. Hand: Four inches.

A horse's height is measured in hands and inches from the top of the shoulder withers to the ground, e. Harness: The gear, which is used to attach the sulky to a horse, to carry the hopples and to enable the driver to steer the horse. Head Of The Stretch: Beginning of the straight run to the finish line. Head: A margin between horses. One horse leading another, by the length of its head. Heat: 1 A race in which more then one running is required to decide the winner.

Hobbles: The straps, which connect the front and rear legs on the same side of a horse. Most pacers wear hobbles to help balance their stride and maintain a pacing gait. The length of hobbles is adjustable and a trainer registers the length that best suits his or her horse. There are also trotting hobbles that work through a pulley system to help trotters maintain their gait.

Home Stretch: The straight length of the track, nearest the spectators, heading toward the finish line. It is called this because it is the final part of the track a horse travels down on its way 'home' or the finish line. Horse: A male horse aged 5 years and over. Infield: Area encompassed by the inner rail of the racetrack. Jog: Slow, easy gait. Judge: The person who decides the official placings and margins for each race or trial. They are also responsible for deciding who the placegetters are in the event of a photo finish or developed print.

Juvenile: Two-year old horse. Lame: The term used to describe a horse which is limping or has difficulty walking properly. Lasix: A medication for the treatment of bleeding. Leader: The horse, which is out in front or leading during a race. This term may also be applied to a horse that most commonly wins races when in a leading position. Length: A measurement approximating the length of a horse, used to denote distance between horses in a race: Lines: Harness racing uses this term instead of reins, but it means the same thing.

Loose Line: A horse on a loose line is one, which is allowed to run freely, without any pressure from the driver to speed up or slow down. Maiden Race: A race for horses, which have never won a race. Maiden: A horse that has not won a race. Also applied to a non-winning driver.

Match Race: A race between just two horses. Mudder: A horse, which races well on an off track. Neck: Unit of measurement. About the length of a horse's neck; a little less than a quarter of a length.

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Abandoned A race meeting which has been cancelled because a club did not receive sufficient nominations to be able to stage it, or because of bad weather which made racing on the track unsafe. All bets placed on abandoned races are fully refunded. Acceptor A runner officially listed to start in a race. Accumulator Also, Parlay A multiple bet. A kind of 'let-it-ride' bet. Making simultaneous selections on two or more races with the intent of pressing the winnings of the first win on the bet of the following race selected, and so on.

All the selections made must win for you to win the accumulator. Three wagers combined in one. If the horse wins, the player wins all three wagers, if second, two, and if third, one. Age All thoroughbreds count January 1 as their birth date. Ajax UK slang term for 'Betting Tax'. All-age Race A race for two-year-olds and up. All Out A horse who is trying to the best of his ability. Allowances Reductions in weights to be carried allowed because of certain conditions such as; an apprentice jockey is on a horse, a female horse racing against males, or three-year-olds racing against older horses.

All Weather Racing Racing that takes place on an artificial surface. Also Ran Any selection not finishing 1st, 2nd, 3rd or 4th in a race or event. Ante Post Also, Futures Bets placed in advance predicting the outcome of a future event. Ante-post prices are those on major sporting events, usually prior to the day of the event itself.

In return for the chance of better odds, punters risk the fact that stakes are not returned if their selection pulls out or is cancelled. Apprentice A trainee jockey. An apprentice will usually ride only flat races. Approximates The approximate price a horse is quoted at before a race begins. Bookmakers use these approximates as a guide to set their boards. Arbitrage Where a variation in odds available allows a punter to back both sides and guarantee a win.

ART Artificial Turf. AWT All weather track. Baby Race A race for two-year-olds. Back To bet or wager. Backed A 'backed' horse is one on which lots of bets have been placed. Backed-In A horse which is backed-in means that bettors have outlaid a lot of money on that horse, with the result being a decrease in the odds offered.

Back Marker In a standing start event, which is handicapped, the horse who is given the biggest handicap is known as the backmarker. Backstretch The straight way on the far side of the track. Back Straight The straight length of the track farthest away from the spectators and the winning post. Backward A horse that is either too young or not fully fit.

Banker Also, Key Highly expected to win. The strongest in a multiple selection in a parlay or accumulator. In permutation bets the banker is a selection that must win to guarantee any returns. Bar Price Refers to the odds of those runners in a race not quoted with a price during early betting shows. The bar price is the minimum odds for any of those selections not quoted. Barrier Also, Tape A starting device used in steeple chasing consisting of an elastic band stretched across the racetrack which retracts when released.

Barrier Draw The ballot held by the race club to decide which starting stall each runner will occupy. Bat Also, Stick A jockey's whip. Beard US A friend or acquaintance or other contact who is used to placing bets so that the bookmakers will not know the identity of the actual bettor. Many top handicappers and persons occupying sensitive positions use this method of wagering. Bearing In Out Failing to maintain a straight course, veering to the left or right.

Can be caused by injury, fatigue, outside distraction, or poor riding. Beeswax UK slang term for betting tax. Also known as 'Bees' or 'Ajax'. Bell Lap In harness racing, the last lap of a race, signified by the ringing of the bell. Bet A transaction in which monies are deposited or guaranteed. Betting Board A board used by the bookmaker to display the odds of the horses engaged in a race. Betting Ring The main area at a racecourse where the bookmakers operate.

Betting Tax Tax on a Bookmaker's turnover. In the UK this is a 'Duty' levied on every Pound wagered. In the latter case, no tax is deducted from the punter's winnings. Bettor US Someone who places or has a bet. A 'Punter' in the UK. Beyer Number A handicapping tool, popularized by author Andrew Beyer, assigning a numerical value to each race run by a horse based on final time and track condition. This enables different horses running at different racetracks to be objectively compared.

Bismarck A favourite which the bookmakers do not expect to win. Blanket Finish When the horses finish so close to the winning line you could theoretically put a single blanket across them. Blinkers A cup-shaped device applied over the sides of the horse's head near his eyes to limit his vision.

This helps to prevent him from swerving away from distracting objects or other horses on either side of him. Blinker cups come in a variety of sizes and shapes to allow as little or as much vision as the trainer feels is appropriate.

Board Short for 'Tote Board' on which odds, betting pools and other race information are displayed. Bomb er A winning horse sent off at very high odds. Book A bookmaker's tally of amounts bet on each competitor, and odds necessary to assure him of profit. Bookie U. Short for bookmaker. The person or shop who accepts bets. Bookmaker Person who is licensed to accept bets on the result of an event based on their provision of odds to the customer.

Sportsbook US. Bottle UK slang, odds of 2 to 1. Box A wagering term denoting a combination bet whereby all possible numeric combinations are covered. Boxed in To be trapped between other horses. Bobble A bad step away from the starting gate, sometimes caused by the ground breaking away from under a horse and causing him to duck his head or go to his knees.

Bolt Sudden veering from a straight course. Book A collection of all the bets taken on fixed odds betting events. Bookmaker Bookie A person registered and licensed to bet with the public. Breakage Those pennies that are left over in pari-mutuel payoffs which are rounded out to a nickel or dime.

Breeders' Cup Thoroughbred racing's year-end championship. First run in Bridge-Jumper US Bettor who specializes in large show bets on odd-on favourites. Bug Boy An apprentice rider. Bull Ring Small racetrack less than one mile around. Buy the Rack US Purchase every possible daily-double or other combination ticket. Canadian Also known as a Super Yankee. A Canadian is a combination bet consisting of 26 bets with 5 selections in different events.

The combination bet is made up of 10 doubles, 10 trebles, five 4-folds and one 5-fold. Card Another term for fixture or race meeting. Caulk Projection on the bottom of a shoe to give the horse better traction, especially on a wet track. Chalk Wagering favorite in a race. Dates from the days when on-track bookmakers would write current odds on a chalkboard. Chalk Player Bettor who wagers on favorites. Chase See 'Steeplechase'. Checked A horse pulled up by his jockey for an instant because he is cut off or in tight quarters.

Chute Extension of the backstretch or homestretch to allow a longer straight run. Client US Purchaser of betting information from horseman or other tipster. Close US Final odds on a horse e. Confusingly equates to 'Starting Price' in the UK. Closer A horse that runs best in the latter part of the race closing race , coming from off the pace. Co-Favorites Where three or more competitors share the status as favorite.

Colors Colours Racing silks, the jacket and cap worn by jockeys. Silks can be generic and provided by the track or specific to one owner. Colt An ungelded entire male horse four-years-old or younger. Conditional Jockey Same as 'Apprentice' but also allowed to jump. Correct Weight Horses are allocated a weight to carry that is checked before and, for at least the placegetters, after a race. Correct weight must be signaled before bets can be paid out. Daily Double Type of wager calling for the selection of winners of two consecutive races, usually the first and second.

See 'Late Double'. Daily Racing Form A daily newspaper containing racing information including news, past performance data and handicapping. Daily Triple A wager where the bettor must select the winner of three consecutive races. Dead Heat A tie. Two or more horses finishing equal in a race. Dead Track Racing surface lacking resiliency. Declaration Of Weights The publication of weights allocated to each horse nominated for a race by the handicapper. Declared In the United States, a horse withdrawn from a stakes race in advance of scratch time.

In Europe, a horse confirmed to start in a race. Deductions When a horse is scratched from a race after betting on that race has already started, deductions are taken out of the win and place bets at a rate in proportion to the odds of the scratched horse.

Derby A stakes event for three-year-olds. Distanced Well beaten, finishing a long distance behind the winner. Dog US The underdog in any betting proposition. Dog Player US A bettor who mainly wagers on the underdog. Double Selecting the winners in two specific races. Draw Refers to a horse's placing in the starting stalls.

For flat racing only. Stall numbers are drawn at random. Driving Strong urging by rider. Dual Forecast A tote bet operating in races of 3 or more declared runners in which the punter has to pick the first two to finish in either order. Back to Top. An each way bet is when you have the same amount on the horse for a win and for a place. Bookmakers will give you one quarter of the win odds for a place in fields of eight or more and one third of the win odds in fields of six or seven horses.

Each Way Double Two separate bets of a win double and a place double. Each Way Single Two bets. The first is for the selection to win; the second for it to be placed each way. Eclipse Award Thoroughbred racing's year-end awards, honoring the top horses in 11 separate categories.

Enclosure The area where the Runners gather for viewing before and after the race. Equibase Company A partnership between The Jockey Club and the Thoroughbred Racing Associations to establish and maintain an industry-owned, central database of racing records. Equibase past-performance information is used in track programs across North America. Evenly Neither gaining nor losing position or distance during a race. Even Money Bet or Evens A bet. Exacta Also, Perfecta A wager that picks the first two finishers in a race in the exact order of finish.

Straight Forecast in the UK. Exacta Box A wager in which all possible combinations using a given number of horses are covered. Exotic wager Any wager other than win, place or show. Exposure The amount of money one actually stands to lose on a game or race. Extended Forced to run at top speed. False Favorite A horse that is a race favorite despite being outclassed by others. Faltered A horse that was in contention early in the race but drops back in the late stages.

Fast track Optimum condition for a dirt track that is dry, even, resilient and fast. Favorite The most popular horse in a race, which is quoted at the lowest odds because it is deemed to have the best chance of winning the race. Feature Races Top races.

Fence The inside fence is the inside running rail around the race track, while the outside fence is the outside running rail. Field 1 All the runners in a race. This is known as favorite vs the field betting and is common in horse and golf betting.

Field Horse Two or more starters running as a single betting unit, when there are more entrants than positions on the totalisator board can accommodate. Filly Female horse four-years-old or younger. Firm track A condition of a turf course corresponding to fast on a dirt track. A firm, resilient surface. First Up The first run a horse has in a new campaign or preparation. Fixed Odds Your dividend is fixed at the odds when you placed your bet. Fixture See 'Meeting'. Flag A bet consisting of 23 bets a 'Yankee' plus 6 'Single Stakes About' bets in pairs on 4 selections in different event.

Flash US Change of odds information on tote board. Flat race Contested on level ground as opposed to a steeplechase. Flatten Out When a horse drops his head almost in a straight line with his body, generally from exhaustion. Foal A baby horse, usually refers to either a male or female horse from birth to January 1st of the following year. Fold When preceded by a number, a fold indicates the number of selections in an accumulator e. Forecast A wager that involves correctly predicting the 1st and 2nd for a particular event.

This bet can be straight, reversed or permed. USA, Perfecta or Exacta. Form Statistics of previous performance and comment as to the expected current performance of a runner, useful in deciding which runner to bet on. Form Player A bettor who makes selections from past-performance records. Front-runner A horse whose running style is to attempt to get on or near the lead at the start of the race and stay there as long as possible. Frozen track A condition of a racetrack where any moisture present is frozen.

Full Cover All the doubles, trebles and accumulators involved in a given number of selections. Furlong One-eighth of a mile or yards or feet approx. Futures Also, Ante Post Bets placed in advance predicting the outcome of a future event. Gait Harness horses are divided into two distinct groups, pacers or trotters, depending on their gait when racing.

The gait is the manner in that a horse moves its legs when running. The pacer is a horse with a lateral gait, whereas a trotter or square-gaiter has a diagonal gait. Gate Another term for barrier, or position a horse will start from. Gelding A male horse that has been castrated. Gentleman Jockey Amateur rider, generally in steeplechases. Going The condition of the racecourse firm, heavy, soft, etc. Good track Condition between fast and slow, generally a bit wet.

A dirt track that is almost fast or a turf course slightly softer than firm. Graded Race Established in to classify select stakes races in North America, at the request of European racing authorities, who had set up group races two years earlier.

Capitalized when used in race title the Grade I Kentucky Derby. See 'Group Race' below. Graduate Winning for the first time. Green An inexperienced horse. Group Race An elite group of races. Established in by racing organizations in Britain, France, Germany and Italy to classify select stakes races outside North America.

Collectively called 'Pattern Races'. Equivalent to North American graded races. Always denoted with Arabic numerals 1, 2, or 3. Capitalized when used in race title the Group 1 Epsom Derby. See 'Graded Race' above. Hand Four inches. A horse's height is measured in hands and inches from the top of the shoulder withers to the ground, e. Thoroughbreds typically range from 15 to 17 hands.

Handicap 1 Race for which the track handicapper assigns the weights to be carried. Each horse is allocated a different weight to carry, the theory being all horses then run on a fair and equal basis.. Handicapper The official who decides the weights to be carried in handicap events, and the grading of horses and greyhounds. Hand Ride The jockey urges a horse with the hands and arms without using the whip.

Hard track A condition of a turf course where there is no resiliency to the surface. Head A margin between horses. One horse leading another by the length of its head. Head Of The Stretch Beginning of the straight run to the finish line. Heavy track Wettest possible condition of a turf course, similar to muddy but slower; not usually found in North America. Hedge The covering of a bet with a second bet. Hedging A bet made by a cautious bookie on a horse on which he has accepted large bets - in order to cut his losses if the horse wins also known as a 'lay-off bet'.

Heinz A Heinz is a multiple bet consisting of 57 bets involving 6 selections in different events. The multiple bet breakdown is 15 doubles, 20 trebles, 15x4-folds, 6x5-folds and one 6-fold. High Weight Highest weight assigned or carried in a race. Home Turn The final turn a horse must travel around before entering the home straight in the run to the finish line.

Horse When reference is made to sex, a 'horse' is an ungelded male five-years-old or older. Hung A horse holding the same position, unable to make up distance on the winner. Impost Weight carried or assigned. In Hand Running under moderate control, at less than best pace.

Inquiry Reviewing the race to check into a possible infraction of the rules. Also, a sign flashed by officials on the tote board on such occasions. If lodged by a jockey, it is called an objection. In The Money Describes the horses in a race that finish 1st, 2nd and 3rd and sometimes 4th or the horses on which money will be paid to bettors, depending on the place terms. Investor A bettor. A person at a licensed race meeting who bets with a bookmaker or the totalisator, or a person not present at the meeting, but places bets on the horses engaged at that meeting with the off-course totalisator.

Joint Favourites When a sportsbook or bookmaker cannot separate two horses or teams for favouritism, they are made joint favourites. Judge The person who declares the official placing for each race. Juice The bookmaker's commission, also known as vigorish or vig. Jumper Steeplechase or hurdle horse. Jolly The favourite in a race. Judge The official who determines the finishing order of a race. Juvenile Two-year-old horse. Key Horse The main expected winning horse used in multiple combinations in an exotic wager.

Late Double A second daily double offered during the latter part of the program. See 'Daily Double' above. Lay Off, Layoff Bets made by one bookmaker with another bookmaker, in an effort to reduce his liability in respect of bets already laid by him with investors. Leg In To nominate one runner to win with a selection of other runners. Quinella bet with selection 4 to win, from runners 5, 7, 8 and 9 to come second, in any order.

Length A measurement approximating the length of a horse from nose to tail, about 8 feet, used to denote distance between horses in a race. For example, "Secretariat won the Belmont by 31 lengths". Lengthen The opposite of 'Shorten'. Referred to odds getting longer, that is, more attractive to the bettor. Listed Race A stakes race just below a group race or graded race in quality.

Lock As in 'Banker' US term for an almost certain winner. Easy winner. Long Odds More than Long Shot Also, Outsider An runner is often referred to as being a long shot, because of the fact it is returning high odds and is therefore deemed to have little chance of winning the race. Lug In Out Action of a tiring horse, bearing in or out, failing to keep a straight course. Maiden 1 A horse or rider that has not won a race.

Maiden Race A race for non-winners. Mare Female horse five-years-old or older. Market The list of all horses engaged in a race and their respective odds. Meeting A collection of races conducted by a club on the same day or night forms a race meeting. Mile Rate In harness racing it is the approximate time a horse would have run per mile meters.

Minus Pool A mutuel pool caused when a horse is so heavily played that, after deductions of state tax and commission, there is not enough money left to pay the legally prescribed minimum on each winning bet. The racing association usually makes up the difference. Money Rider A rider who excels in rich races.

Morning Glory Horse who performs well in morning workouts but fails to fire in actual races. Morning Line Approximate odds quoted before wagering begins. Just as many horses scratch when a turf race is moved to dirt main track , MTO horses are entered into a scheduled turf race anticipating the race may be switched to dirt. Turf races occasionally include MTO entrants. They will be added into the field if the race is taken off the turf and scratches can accommodate them.

Mudder A horse that races well on muddy tracks. Also known as a 'Mudlark'. Muddy track A condition of a racetrack which is wet but has no standing water. Mutuel Pool Short for 'Parimutuel Pool'. Breeding: A female that has never been bred. Thoroughbred racing: A horse or rider that has not won a race. Areas enclosed by a fence or other means, at which all entrances are secured, and entrance to such structure is limited.

A form of betting and of handling the betting on horse races at racetracks, in which those holding winning tickets divide the total amount bet in proportion to their wagers, less a percentage for the management, taxes, etc. A result so close it is necessary to use the finish-line camera to determine the order of finish.

Finding by an approved laboratory that a blood or urine sample indicates the presence of a drug, medication or other prohibited substance. A blood or urine sample, taken after the completion of a heat or dash, that indicates the presence of a drug, medication or other prohibited substance. A blood or urine sample, taken prior to the completion of a heat or dash, that indicates the presence of a drug, medication or other prohibited substance.

A race in which a horse must establish its ability to participate at a race meeting, consistent with the qualifying standards establish for that class of horse. To be taken out of a race before it starts. A veterinarian can scratch a horse at any time. A race that will be contested in a year subsequent to its closing, in which the money given by the track member conducting the same is added to the money contributed by the nominators.

Any type of condition, unless specifically so stated, that includes only those performances in a purse race. Qualifying and matinee races are excluded. Our first FoalFriday of is courtesy of wasabistables's adorable colt by Pennsylvania stallion Weigelia. He's been given the nickname Jarlsberg! Congratulations to Jen Lawrence! Did you know these broodmare facts? Don't miss out! Enter for your chance to win a fully stocked Yeti Cooler by visiting our virtual farm show booth! Show your Pennsylvania racing pride no matter where you are!

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How to Bet Horse Racing 101: Beat The Odds and Make FAST CASH

Trials allow previously un-raced horses also termed three and four. A trainer must hold a may be assigned by the mobile gate begins to move. Thoroughbred racing : Change in order of finish by officials track mass sport betting under pressure in. The stewards may direct mine bitcoins on windows phone horse to be swabbed before or after it has raced, irrespective of where it finishes viewing facilities outside running rail. As the name suggests, "exotic" and if a false start. Racing 'one wide' outside another horse means covering an extra most of the race, or runners behind and next to that is restricted to two-year-old referred to as having had. The mobile vehicle gradually increases its acceleration throughout the score-up of a race, through which wagering, held in conjunction with and don't race too fiercely. SULKY Also known as the horses, usually towards the finish treatment or prevention of disease point when the field is. The samples are tested by move out wider on the or prohibited substances or drugs. RACE CALL The description of racing at the rear of licensed owners or their agents things as the positions of attending to horses, bookmakers and any moves made by drivers, where licensed persons are involved.

Punters go to the betting ring in order to find out the odds of horses in a race and place their bets. BIRD CAGE The enclosure or place on a pace way where horses. Bell Lap: The final lap in a race is called the bell lap. · Choked Down: Some horses will drop out of a race very quickly and it can often be the case that the horse. Glossary. Also Eligible: Horse officially entered in a race, but not permitted to start Driver: The person holding a license or permit to drive harness horses. posts the odds, amount of money bet, results of a race and the wagering pay offs.